Agricultural Shows in Africa are Still Going Strong

Taking the Buck by the Horns…

Horns come in handy for a lot of things.  This Alpine Buck, grandpa of many of our cross-bred goats, isn't too pleased

Horns come in handy for a lot of things. This German Alpine Buck is father and grandpa of many of our crossbred goats here in Burundi.

A while back Rachel Laudan put up a link that explains the Royal Agricultural Show in the UK was would no longer be operating, due to lack of funds and other problems.  Given the changes in modern farming described in the article, this seems inevitable.

In Africa, however, these kinds of events continue to play a very important role, especially in ex-British colonies. During the colonial period, national and international agricultural shows were organized, and following independence these have continued in some countries. They are both a means of exchanging information and techniques, as well as simply having a lot of fun.

In countries where transportation, communication, and access to new technologies are still problematic, these events will likely continue sometime into the future.  Not a bad colonial legacy, I would argue.

My familiarity with them comes primarily from Kenya, where new breeds of livestock are exhibited, wonderful cheeses and other products are shown off and sold, and competitions of many kinds are held. These pictures show how a goat farmer – a retired school teacher in Kenya – has profited from his participation in Agricultural shows and related training events, and how we – in turn – have benefited from the goats that he has bred by importing offspring to Burundi:

A retired school teacher in Kenya who, thanks to agricultural shows and related training, is now raising someof the finest dairy goats in the country.

A retired school teacher in Kenya who, thanks to agricultural shows and related training, is now raising some of the finest dairy goats in the country.

Showing off a prize buck - a purebred German Alpine, some of whose offspring we imported here to Burundi for cross-breeding

Showing off a prize buck - a purebred German Alpine, some of whose offspring we imported here to Burundi for crossbreeding. The buck

Showing of a raised goat house that allows for urine and manure to drop through, collected and used on fodder crops.

Explaining that the current raised goat house allows for urine and manure to drop through, to be collected and used on fodder crops. A second raised goat house is being built.

A 'keyhole waterer' - the technique was exhibited at one of the agricultural fares

A

About 10 of the bucks in our buck multiplication herd here in Burundi are sons of the Kenya buck shown above.

About 10 of the bucks in our senior buck multiplication herd here in Burundi are sons of the Kenya buck shown above.

Our buck herd leaving the old compound for the Imbo plains along Lake Tanganyika

Our senior buck herd leaving the old compound for the Imbo plains along Lake Tanganyika

Advertisements

About dianabuja

With a group of BaTwa (pygmy) women potters, with whom we've worked to enhance production and sales of their wonderful pots - fantastic for cooking and serving. To see the 2 blogs on this work enter 'batwa pots' into the search engine located just above this picture. Blog entries throughout this site are about Africa, as well as about the Middle East and life in general - reflecting over 35 years of work and research in Africa and the Middle East – Come and join me!
This entry was posted in Africa-General, Breeds of livestock, Burundi, Colonialism, Dairy goats, Goat farmer, Kenya, Livestock, Rachel Laudan, Research & Development and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Agricultural Shows in Africa are Still Going Strong

  1. I love those raised goat houses. And agricultural fairs!

    Like

    • dianabuja says:

      Yes – and this link gives more information on raised goat houses and other low-tech solutions for low-input farmers (most of the world’s farmers)…

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s