Contract Farming: Signing Contracts and experimental crops in the village

Our experimental – or pilot plots have not only been successful in selecting crops that are going to grow very well in our area, but also in increasing interest in the project amongst villagers.

In this regard it is a win-win situation:  better prices for the farmers because of diversified cropping (introducing new varieties that grow well here), and provision of fresh, biological produce for the Hotel.

We have seven smallholders under contract right now, five women and two young men.  In another entry, I will put up the contract.  It is in Kirundi (I’ll put up an english translation):

Reading and discussing contracts (they are translated into Kirundi)

A contractee with her own and some other children

Lenga-lenga (local amaranth), planted and being planted. A mono-crop in the village

Trying out different seeds to ascertain the most suitable for this region is also successful and farmers are very glad for this approach.

We are in an agro-region called the Imbo, which is a very sandy and hot strip that stretches along Lake Tanganyika.  A few 1000 meters upcountry, quite a different mix of crops can be grown.

Here are the results of our pilot plots so far:

Growing or being harvested:

Radish (red and white)
green beans
indigenous eggplants
tomatoes
Armenian cucumbers
green peppers
maize
garden peas
Kenyan spinach
Kenyan sukuma wiki
Seeds that have failed
Italian basil
tall celery
flat parsley
Italian rucola
American okra

Failures could be resulting either from seed/variety type or from non-adaptability to the Imbo.  We will try other varieties.

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About dianabuja

With a group of BaTwa (pygmy) women potters, with whom we've worked to enhance production and sales of their wonderful pots - fantastic for cooking and serving. To see the 2 blogs on this work enter 'batwa pots' into the search engine located just above this picture. Blog entries throughout this site are about Africa, as well as about the Middle East and life in general - reflecting over 35 years of work and research in Africa and the Middle East – Come and join me!
This entry was posted in Africa-Central, Agriculture, Contract-Farming, Hotel Club du Lac Tanganyika2. Bookmark the permalink.

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