Green activists ‘are keeping Africa poor’

This is a good example of the kind of pro-agroindustrial opinion, by Britain’s former chief scientist, that totally ignores realities of farming in Africa.

At the same time, I do agree that there are many organizations, primarily NGOs, that have little understanding of local farming techniques and rationalities, and therefore promote ‘green farming’ in more of an ideological frame of reference that one based on farming realities.

Also, that agroindustry does offer some solutions to Africa’s food problems.  As most things, it’s just not altogether simple.

Bugeyuzi, upcountry - heavily farmed fields - traditional multiple cropping technique

TimesonlineMark Henderson, Science Editor

Western do-gooders are impoverishing Africa by promoting traditional farming at the expense of modern scientific agriculture, according to Britain’s former chief scientist.

Anti-science attitudes among aid agencies, poverty campaigners and green activists are denying the continent access to technology that could improve millions of lives, Professor Sir David King will say today.

Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) from Europe and America are turning African countries against sophisticated farming methods, including GM crops, in favour of indigenous and organic approaches that cannot deliver the continent’s much needed “green revolution”, he believes.

Speaking before a keynote lecture tonight to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, of which he is president, Sir David said that the slow pace of African development was linked directly to Western influence.

I’m going to suggest, and I believe this very strongly, that a big part has been played in the impoverishment of that continent by the focus on nontechnological agricultural techniques, on techniques of farming that pertain to the history of that continent rather than techniques that pertain to modern technological capability.

Why has that continent not joined Asia in the big green revolutions that have taken place over the past few decades? The suffering within that continent, I believe, is largely driven by attitudes developed in the West which are somewhat anti-science, anti-technology – attitudes that lead towards organic farming, for example, attitudes that lead against the use of genetic technology for crops that could deal with increased salinity in the water, that can deal with flooding for rice crops, that can deal with drought resistance.”

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About dianabuja

With a group of BaTwa (pygmy) women potters, with whom we've worked to enhance production and sales of their wonderful pots - fantastic for cooking and serving. To see the 2 blogs on this work enter 'batwa pots' into the search engine located just above this picture. Blog entries throughout this site are about Africa, as well as about the Middle East and life in general - reflecting over 35 years of work and research in Africa and the Middle East – Come and join me!
This entry was posted in Africa-General, Indigenous crops & medicinal plants, Research & Development, Technology. Bookmark the permalink.

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