Kitties in Africa, Past and Present

With the new year upon us, I look back at the animals I brought here from Kenya.  That included: 3 cats, 2 dogs, my 2 horses, and a van-load of Alpine and Boer breeding goats for our restocking and herd upgrading program.  But here, I want to look just at the cats – Lulu, Boy-boy and Binty and those who followed them.

Binty and Boy-boy Burmese cats from Karen, Kenya, were devoted to each other - but also quite friendly with people.  They are sitting in front of a hand-made cloth from Naivasha, Kenya.

Binty and Boy-boy Burmese cats from Karen, Kenya, were devoted to each other – but also quite friendly with people. They are sitting in front of a hand-made cloth from Naivasha, Kenya.

Lulu, the third cat who came with me, was a 50% East African Wild Cat (Felis lybica).  Far too intelligent for a cat, he not only reigned over the other felids, but also over the dogs, visitors, and others who visited.

Lulu, the third cat who came with me, was a 50% East African Wild Cat (Felis lybica). Far too intelligent for a cat, he not only reigned over the other felids, but also over the dogs, visitors, and others who visited.

Wild Cat in South Africa, flipping over in order to catch a pigeon - 1.8 m. high.  I never saw Lulu perform this movement, but he did have others of a spectacular nature.  Source: Telegraph

Wild Cat in South Africa, flipping over in order to catch a pigeon – 1.8 m. high. I never saw Lulu perform this movement, but he did have others of a spectacular nature. Source: Telegraph

Sadly, these three kitties died over the last several years, having lived out interesting and productive kitty-lives  in Kenya and here in Burundi.  Followed, however, by three other moggies:

Bébé came to me as a baby, from a friend who never returned to collect him.  He's still with us - now living in the village, with the goats and guard dogs.  A very scrappy cat.

Bébé came to me as a baby, from a friend who never returned to collect him. He’s still with us – now living in the village, with the goats and guard dogs. A very scrappy cat.

Then, more recently, I was gifted with three kits - a boy and 2 girls.

Then, more recently, I was gifted with three kits – a boy and 2 girls.

The boy went over to the village to live with Bébé, the guard dogs and the goats - looking out for rats and so forth.

The boy went over to the village to live with Bébé, the guard dogs and the goats – looking out for rats and so forth – while the 2 girls (above) stayed with me; Binty ii and Lulu ii.

Binty specializes in getting into trouble, and is a charmer.  Little Lulu ii disappeared a few weeks ago and we've not yet seen her.  But are hoping she will return.

Binty specializes in getting into trouble, and is a charmer. Little Lulu ii disappeared a few weeks ago and we’ve not yet seen her. But are hoping she will return.

Advertisements

About dianabuja

With a group of BaTwa (pygmy) women potters, with whom we've worked to enhance production and sales of their wonderful pots - fantastic for cooking and serving. To see the 2 blogs on this work enter 'batwa pots' into the search engine located just above this picture. Blog entries throughout this site are about Africa, as well as about the Middle East and life in general - reflecting over 35 years of work and research in Africa and the Middle East – Come and join me!
This entry was posted in Africa-East, Cats, East central Africa, Pets, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s