The Dry Season in Burundi – Time to Celebrate! II of III (Rural Notables – An Engagement, Pt.ii)

This is the second part of the blog on Rural Notables – the celebration that took place after all of the food preparation took place, as discussed in the past blog of this series.

Dao, father of the groom-to-be, gives the dowry to Omer, father of the bride-to-be, in a traditional basket.

Deo, father of the groom-to-be, gives the dowry to Omer, father of the bride-to-be, in a traditional basket.

DIANABUJA'S BLOG: Africa, The Middle East, Agriculture, History and Culture

Revised 12 July 2014

After all of the food had been prepared and the entertainment arranged for  Yvonne’s engagement party, it was time for the guests to arrive and the celebration to begin.

Links to sauteed ndagala (whitebait) recipe that was prepared for the engagement feast is given at the end of the blog.

Evonne's younger sister, Elianne, is dressed in her new smock and with a cousin is coming with a traditional basket of beans for the newly-engaged couple
Yvonne’s younger sister, Elianne, is dressed in her new smock and with a cousin is coming with a traditional basket of beans for the newly-engaged couple

The guests have been seated in a large, open-front tent made of wooden poles and plastic sheeting.  Then, Yvonne is brought in by a group of women relatives who clap and sing that she is going to be a happy bride &c.  In spite of joyful songs and urging, Evonne hangs her head and moves very slowly, as part of the ceremony she is showing her sadness at leaving her own…

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About dianabuja

With a group of BaTwa (pygmy) women potters, with whom we've worked to enhance production and sales of their wonderful pots - fantastic for cooking and serving. To see the 2 blogs on this work enter 'batwa pots' into the search engine located just above this picture. Blog entries throughout this site are about Africa, as well as about the Middle East and life in general - reflecting over 35 years of work and research in Africa and the Middle East – Come and join me!
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