A Ptolemaic Tale of Lust and Abandonment

A take by Reeder =

.. it is not coincidental that the Egyptian word muu, for the so-called muu dancers, … who were responsible for bringing the souls of the dead to the afterworld, referred to jesters, buffoons, and dwarfs (Budge, 1978; Faulkner, 1986), for these dancers were evidently originally the Egyptian analogues of the dancing mushroom spirits people have typically seen after ingesting entheogenic mushrooms.

This analysis is in full accord with: (1) the belief that the muu were originally dwarfs, just as the word for them implies (Moret, 1927); (2) the belief that the muu crown was a variation of the White Crown (Abubakr, 1937); (3) the belief that the muu were personified crowns (Altenmuller, 1975), for the muu were indeed originally personifications of the Psilocybes* their crowns were designed to represent

* Psilocybes – a genus of small mushroom with psychedelic properties.  ” Psilocybin mushroom ingestion results in hallucinatory symptoms which begin as early as ten minutes post ingestion and typically last anywhere from four to twelve hours, although cases of much longer duration have been reported in the literature. While personal accounts of intoxication share some common themes, both the intensity and length of the hallucinogenic effects of Psilocybes are highly variable.

This variability has been attributed to many factors, including the psychological characteristics of the user, the cultural background of the user, the mood or expectations of the user prior to ingestion (the “set”), the environment of the user (the setting), the psilocybin content (which can vary ten-fold between individual species and may change as a result of preparation or handling), previous use of hallucinogens, and concurrent use of other drugs or alcohol. Also, it is possible that individual sensitivities may result from inherited differences in metabolic capability.”

Source  > The Mysterious Muu and the Dance They Do, by Greg Reeder

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Supersyllabogram A for amphora with the aromatic and dye saffron UPDATE

Nice, Rida – Merci!

Ritaroberts's Blog

Source: Supersyllabogram A for amphora with the aromatic and dye saffron UPDATE

This is one of many of Richard Vallance posts about the Linear B ancient scripts writings.  As you all know Richard is teaching me this subject and I thought my fellow bloggers would like to read more of his translations  as he explains in great detail more than I can about the Minoan/Mycenaean writings which help bring the past culture to life. Please leave a comment and or a like on his blog and not mine. I will be posting more of Richard translations very soon. Don’t forget please leave him a comment as he is dedicated to his subject and works so very hard.

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Récent happenings Here in Burundi

I’ve been out of circulation for some weeks due to illness – soon to catch up/In the meantime, here is an interesting article on weaving in the old kingdom and nice photo of a very unhappy Manul cat. Sorry – computer problems here and will get back to you in  day or so.

(1) The Hidden Industry_ Weaving at the Workers’ Settlement _ Ana Tavares – Academia

· Le Manul ou chat de Pallas FB

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Ancient Lives: Papyrology for People Who aren’t Papyrologists

More and more manuscripts are now appearing online – and, as this one – invites everyone to join. “The site is an attempt to harness the power of the people in an effort to transcribe as-yet unpublished Greek papyri fragments from Oxyrhynchus, Egypt: Ancient Lives is a collaboration between a diverse collection of Oxford Papyrologists and Researchers, The Imaging Papyri Project, The Oxyrhynchus Papyri Project, the Egypt Exploration Society and the following institutions.

The papyri belong to the Egypt Exploration Society and their texts will eventually be published and numbered in Society’s Greco-Roman Memoirs series in the volumes entitled The Oxyrhynchus Papyri. The best part, though, is that you don’t need to be a papyrologist to get in on the fun. You don’t even need to know Greek! (Although it doesn’t hurt…)

Source - Ancient lives

The interface for the transcription project is incredibly user-friendly, even for non-specialists. I watched an entire classroom of NT Intro students (most of whom had never taken a day of Greek) spend an hour exploring the site and transcribing fragments. They were into it.

The site loads for you a papyrus fragment. You look at the letters on the papyrus (even for people who know Greek, that’s all they are at first) and try to match each one up with a letter or special character in the ancient Greek alphabet. Here [above is] a screenshot of a fragment I’m currently working on to give you an idea: transcribe The blue circles are letters that I have, or think I have, identified so far. The red circle is the current letter I am deciphering…

Let the Reader Understand

A few months ago I was introduced to the University of of Oxford’s Ancient Lives papyri transcription project while TAing a class for Eric Smith. This morning I rediscovered it and have been having some fun transcribing ancient Greek fragments.

The site is an attempt to harness the power of the people in an effort to transcribe as-yet unpublished Greek papyri fragments from Oxyrhynchus, Egypt:

Ancient Lives is a collaboration between a diverse collection of Oxford Papyrologists and Researchers, The Imaging Papyri Project, The Oxyrhynchus Papyri Project, the Egypt Exploration Society and the following institutions.

The papyri belong to the Egypt Exploration Society and their texts will eventually be published and numbered in Society’s Greco-Roman Memoirs series in the volumes entitled The Oxyrhynchus Papyri.

The best part, though, is that you don’t need to be a papyrologist to get in on the fun. You don’t even need to know Greek! (Although it…

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Antiquity Imagined: The Remarkable Legacy of Egypt and the Ancient Near East

New Book –

“‘Knowledge is the ultimate addiction. What we cannot find in the directly observable world, we invent. With patience and erudition Robin Derricourt explores a prominent field of alternative knowledge, ‘the remarkable legacy of Egypt and the ancient Near East’, where theories proliferate which mainstream researchers either reject or ignore. Pyramid theorists, Egypt as part of a pan-African black civilisation, the search for the ten lost tribes of Israel: the author’s range is remarkable…

HARN Weblog

HARN member, Robin Derricourt, has sent us notification of his latest publication:

Antiquity Imagined front cover

Antiquity Imagined: the remarkable legacy of Egypt and the ancient Near East (London: I.B. Tauris, 2015)

 Outsiders have long attributed to the Middle East, and especially to ancient Egypt, meanings that go way beyond the rational and observable. The region has been seen as the source of civilization, religion, the sciences and the arts; but also of mystical knowledge and outlandish theories, whether about the Lost City of Atlantis or visits by alien beings. In his exploration of how its past has been creatively interpreted by later ages, Robin Derricourt surveys the various claims that have been made for Egypt – particularly the idea that it harbours an esoteric wisdom vital to the world’s survival. He looks at ‘alternative’ interpretations of the pyramids, from maps of space and time to landing markers for UFOs; at images of the…

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On the origin of Roman concrete

Interesting, from Per Storem

Per Storemyr Archaeology & Conservation

The Pantheon cupola in Rome, made by Roman concrete some 2000 years ago. Source: Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 3.0 The Pantheon cupola in Rome, made by Roman concrete some 2000 years ago. Source: Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 3.0

You mix burnt lime, volcanic ash and sand/gravel. Then you have the famed concrete that made the Romans able to build the Pantheon cupola, or to make underwater constructions, like big harbours. And without Roman concrete, we may not have had our modern concrete, based on Portland cement, enabling us to build ever bigger, higher and deeper. But how was Roman concrete discovered?

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Gift of a Belgian Malinois Puppy

I’m very thrilled to have been given a Belgian Malinois puppy last week!  Several years ago, as some of you may remember, I did have a dog of the same breed – Hamdy by name; given to me by a Belgian who lives in the eastern Congo. Fantastic guard for me and for the goats:

Some of our goats going upcountry.

Some of our goats going upcountry.

Hamdy checking out the goats that are leaving; great guard, Hamdy.

Hamdy checking out the goats that are leaving; great guard, Hamdy.

Looks like Hamdy is counting the leaving stock.

Looks like Hamdy is counting the leaving stock.

But Hamdy could be so kind and loving - here, talking to me.

But Hamdy could be so kind and loving – here, ‘talking’ to me.

My new pup is also called Hamdy – named after H.1 who finally died.  Hamdy 2 is a lovely little puppy and quite stroppy; looks a bit like this pup –

belgian-malinois-puppy-picture-115daca2-483a-4a83-9bac-free-stock-illustration

belgian-malinois-puppy-picture-1-free-stock-illustration

Here are a couple of hunky videos on the breed – they really are quite fierce if left to their own devices; great guards and equally great companions:

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