Author Archives: dianabuja

About dianabuja

With a group of BaTwa (pygmy) women potters, with whom I've worked to enhance production and sales of their wonderful pots - fantastic for cooking and serving. See these 2 blogs: Batwa Pots in Burundi: Traditional Clay Pot Cuisine, Pt. 1 of 2 https://dianabuja.wordpress.com/2011/10/25/batwa-pots-in-burundi-traditional-clay-pot-cuisine-pt-1-of-2/ Batwa Pots in Burundi: Traditional Clay Pot Cuisine, Pt. 2 of 2 https://dianabuja.wordpress.com/2011/10/26/batwa-pots-in-burundi-traditional-clay-pot-cuisine-pt-2-of-2/ Blog entries throughout this site are about Africa, as well as about the Middle East and life in general - reflecting over 35 years of work and research in Africa and the Middle East – Come and join me!

Baking Holy Bread in the Coptic Monasteries of the Eastern Desert of Egypt [qurban; ‘urban]

,, Bread was the central element of cuisine and daily nourishment in Ancient Egypt, from the very poorest through the nobility. Today, bread is commonly known as ‘aysh in Egypt, meaning ‘life’ in Arabic.  In the Old Kingdom, so-called rectangular slab stelae regularly picture … Continue reading

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Posted in Bread, Coptic, Cuisine, Egypt-Ancient, Egypt-Recent, Food, Qurbana, St. Anthony, St. Paul | Tagged , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

A Pickled Goose and Two Pillows – Cuisine and Comfort in Ptolemaic Egypt, 9 May 137 B.C.

Geese were very popular in ancient Egypt as food and also for the use of their grease and feathers.  As well, the Egyptian god Geb – called also ‘The Great Cackler’ figured centrally in ancient Egyptian religion: Notables and those with … Continue reading

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Posted in Egypt, Egyptology, Fayyum, Giza, Heracleopolis, Keeping the peace, Ptolemaic era | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Magicality of Cuisine 4: A Special Dish for a Woman Cultivator, 19th Century Liberia, West Africa

As with other ‘magical dishes’ in this series, it is the context and activities associated with the dish that render it effective – not merely the specified ingredients: Pre-modern cuisine in many parts of the world can be more fully understood … Continue reading

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Posted in Africa-West, Agriculture, Cuisine, European colonizers, Food, Indigenous crops & medicinal plants, Organic Gardenig, Robert Nassau | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

An Account of the Plague in Barbary, North Africa, 1799 – Part II

Some Account of a peculiar Species of Plague which depopulated West Barbary in 1799 and 1800, and to the Effects of which the Author was an eyewitness. By James G. Jackson, Mogodor/ Essaouira Part I, can be found here. From various … Continue reading

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Posted in Africa-North, Africa-West, Colonialism, Ebola, European colonizers, European explorers, Indigenous crops & medicinal plants, Sahel | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

An Account of the Plague in Barbary, North Africa, 1799 – Part I

Plagues have been important – and often deadly – aspect of long distance trade and travel for millennia.   As we enter into the 21st century plague that is now gripping West Africa, what can be learned from reports of ‘the plague’ … Continue reading

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Posted in Africa-North, Africa-West, Caravan routes, Colonialism, Indigenous crops & medicinal plants, Niger River | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog. These are the posts that got the most views in 2014. 1حلبه (Hilba; Fenugreek) – A Wonderful Winter Drink and Herbal Medicine in Egypt26 COMMENTSJune 2011 2Teeth-filing … Continue reading

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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Christmas Celebrations at the Hotel Club du Lac Tanganyika

A little over a week ago I put up a blog on Christmas celebrations, village style:  Christmas in Burundi: Celebrations in the Nearby Village of Kajaga-Kinyinya Now, here is how the ‘better off’ celebrate Christmas cuisine: Revised  27 Dec. 2014>   Chef Richard and his … Continue reading

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Posted in Africa-Central, Christmas, Cuisine, Food, Hotel Club du Lac Tanganyika2, Lake Tanzanya, Living here | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments